Wednesday, 29 August 2012

The Artist Unleashed: WHY WRITING IS LIKE PRACTICING MEDICINE, by Lydia Kang

The Artist Unleashed posts have moved to a new domain. Please click HERE to read the rest of this post and for the opportunity to comment. Just search for the title of the post in the search bar on the new site.

35 comments:

  1. Enlightening as always Lydia. Just wondering whether you are a creative prescription writer?

    ReplyDelete
  2. But ... I WANT to live alone in a shack in the woods and write ... okay, fine. The kids probably wouldn't appreciate that choice. Great post, Lydia!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Ah, when two of the best come together, it's like whiskey and beer ... or something. Anyway, you guys are great! Love this feature. And I would love a cabin in the woods myself!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Great seeing you here, Lydia. And you're so cool...getting wisdom from Ratatoille. And guys...I'll have a casita in the jungle soon if anyone's interested.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Writing isn't a piece of meat - funny!
    And quoting Ratatouille isn't cheating.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Such great analogy Lydia. I loved the comparisons. Thanks for another great post.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Great post, Lydia. I'm glad you mentioned the part about learning. I know an author who thinks because he is published through a small press, he doesn't need to learn anymore. Nice try! Most careers require us to keep learning.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Great comparison! Love the quote, Lydia.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Very apt comparisons. I am going to share withis with some folks I know who are writers~

    ReplyDelete
  10. Good collection of points - thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Loved this Lydia! How 'bout the wine and coffee drinking curmudgeon in a shack in the woods? Kind of sounds like my ideal writing lab. :0)

    ReplyDelete
  12. I love #3, and especially #5. Great comparisons, Lydia, and a fun way to think of the practice of writing.

    ReplyDelete
  13. This is wonderful. Lydia is such a role model!

    ReplyDelete
  14. All very true - esp. the crit partner. My writing has vastly improved since I got mine :)

    ReplyDelete
  15. Wonderful post, Lydia. Completely agree with it.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Thanks for the comparison. It was really helpful, especially #1.

    And crit partners are amazing!

    ReplyDelete
  17. What great insights. My Dad's a doctor and can probably relate to all of these.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I need a crit partner stat! I think I will approach her tonight with cookies in hand.

    ReplyDelete
  19. There's more in common between doctoring and writing than I thought!

    ReplyDelete
  20. I like your list! I'd never thought of there being much connection between writers and doctors.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Hooray for Dr. Lydia! Two of my favorite people in one place. It's like a Reese's peanut butter cup! :D

    This is all such great advice. Good points about the perspective and the fresh eyes and the taking a break. Best to both of you. Can't wait to read CONTROL! :o) <3

    ReplyDelete
  22. Thank you guys for stopping by! :D

    ReplyDelete
  23. Great advice, Lydia, especially the one about taking time off.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Love the comparison, so true! Thanks, Lydia, for sharing. Jessica, thanks for hosting! :)

    ReplyDelete
  25. Really good stuff, Lydia. I especially love the part about living. Although our characters and stories can take over sometimes, it's our real lives that matter the most.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Great interview! Love that list :D Thanks for sharing!

    Jen

    ReplyDelete
  27. Great post, Lydia! I love your stuff, as always. I usually think of writing as therapy, which is... a TYPE of medicine, sort of kind of, right?

    And any girl that quotes Pixar is gonna earn brownie points from me ;)

    ReplyDelete
  28. Great post, Lydia! Super analogy. :)

    ReplyDelete
  29. I never would have thought medicine is like writing. Great guest post.

    ReplyDelete
  30. I loved this list. Number 5 is something I need to remember, something I strive to remember. I feel often so out of balance.

    ReplyDelete
  31. I like your take on that chef line, Lydia. It took me a while before I could see a novel as a whole. It's a long journey. I'm six years and counting. I may not have a published novel until I've done the time equivalent of a brain surgeon.

    ReplyDelete
  32. Oh I love this interview and the analogy. I agree about writing day and night. It doesn't allow for creativity, exposure to new ideas and life that provides the stimuli for your writing.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Lydia~ you're genius wherever you go!

    ReplyDelete

“I'm using my art to comment on what I see. You don't have to agree with it.” ~John Mellencamp

“Allowing an unimportant mistake to pass without comment is a wonderful social grace” ~Judith S. Marin

“I don't ever try to make a serious social comment.” ~Paul McCartney

“I'd make a comment at a meeting and nobody would even acknowledge me. Then some man would say the same thing and they'd all nod.” ~Charlotte Bunch

“Probably what my comment meant was that I don't care about the circumstances if I can tell the truth.” ~Sally Kirkland

“We're not going to pay attention to the silliness and the petty comments. And quite frankly, women have joined me in this effort, and so it's not about appearances. It's about effectiveness.” ~Katherine Harris