Monday, 5 November 2012

Show & Tell in a Nutshell: Demonstrated Transitions from Telling to Showing

On November 12, my pocket guide, Show & Tell in a Nutshell: Demonstrated Transitions from Telling to Showing, will be released, and I'm super excited about this little book!

When I first started writing, I totally didn't understand the concept of "show, not tell". In theory I could, but when I tried to put it into practice it would just end up being a more fancy version of telling. I always wished there were easy-to-access, and reliable examples out there to refer to. And so this book was born! &
Here's the blurb:
Have you been told that you have a little too much telling in your novel? Want to remedy it? Then this is the book for you!
In Show & Tell in a Nutshell: Demonstrated Transitions from Telling to Showing you will find sixteen real scenes depicting a variety of situations, emotions, and characteristics which clearly demonstrate how to turn telling into showing. Dispersed throughout, and at the back of the book, are blank pages to take notes as you read. A couple of short writing prompts are also provided.
Not only is this pocket guide an excellent learning tool for aspiring writers, but it is a light, convenient, and easy solution to honing your craft no matter how broad your writing experience. Keep it in the side pocket of your school bag, throw it in your purse, or even carry it around in the pocket of your jeans or jacket, to enhance your skills, keep notes, and jot down story ideas, anywhere, anytime.
Of course, a Kindle version will be available at the same time with a slightly different introduction and blurb, as it won't need any note-taking space.

And so, in light of this, I'm going to write up a short advertorial blog post, and transfer it to HTML, for those who are interested in helping me advertise between November 26 and December 10. Are you interested in helping me out? If so, just say yo in the comments, with the date you want, and I'll be in touch via email!

When you were just beginning to write, how did you wrap your mind around the show, not tell rule? Did you crave real examples like me? Do you think your beginner self would have benefited from such a book? Why?





25 comments:

  1. Jess, what a lovely idea. I'd be happy to help. I'll be out of the country from 11/17 to 11/26 so give me a date after 12/1 and I'll do it.
    Karen

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  2. This sounds like a great little book, Jessica. My beginner writer self needed those examples for sure.

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  3. I think it had more to do with 'feeling' the difference. My first novel was chuck full of telling because I felt very 'narrator-esque' and wanted to be all whimsical and mysterious. I told myself it was 'voice', but no, seriously, it was just a lot of telling. I felt the difference further into the book, when I really 'lived' the character and saw things and felt things through their eyes and when the action became harmonious with that. Now it's easy to feel and identify the difference in my own work right away, and in others. Great idea for a how-to Jess!

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    1. Yes, and I also say something similar in the introduction. You need to figure it out yourself for it to completely stick. Thanks, Katie!

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  4. Sounds like an awesome book, Jessica. I read a similar book recently. Now warning alarms goes off anytime I tell. :D

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  5. I will definitely help advertise it! Send it on over, red rover! :D As for how I got past show, not tell, hmm.... I think revisions help with it a lot. I know sometimes I'll slip into telling when I'm not super-sure how a scene's going to go and I'm still working it out in my head. Then when I go back and revise, I'm like, "Oh, heck no..." LOL! :D Revisions make us better--as do great tools like your book! <3

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  6. Congratulations! Let us know when it's out because I am definitely buying that book.

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    1. Thanks, Alex! Now what would you be in need of a book like this for, huh? You're a pro!

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  7. I say Yo! (You picking up our most Philly of expressions, or was that just an awesome, funky typo?)

    So excited for your Show/Tell handbook. I know it will be a great resource for loads of people. My show/tell weakness was always the balance issue--knowing how much showing is enough with out going on too long and letting descriptions get out of proportion with how important the moment is in the overall story flow.

    Tuesday, December 4 is good for me.

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    1. Thanks, Laurel! Haha, no, that's just me being silly. Totally intentional!

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  8. Sounds like a great book. Showing/telling is such a hard thing when you're just starting out and even as you continue to write there is a delicate balance between too much and too little.

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  9. That is a much needed book. So many are confused about show vs. tell. And often that's me!

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  10. Yes, I could have used such a book, and probably still could use such a book. There's always room for improvement.

    I'd be happy to help out with your launch if you're still looking for volunteers. I think you have my email.

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  11. Woo hoo! Congrats! I can distinctly remember when i finally, full understood the show vs tell thing and it changed everything

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  12. I could've used this book way back. I took me way to long to get better at it, and I'm sure there are still mistakes I make.

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  13. I'm sure I can find a day during that time!

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  14. Hi Jess - sounds like an excellent guide - I'll definitely be getting it - good luck with the promotion ... cheers Hilary

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  15. What a great idea, Jess! I haven't been by in awhile (blogslacker) and your blog looks great! Love the changes.
    Anyway, I'd be happy to help out with a post. Email me anytime. :)

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  16. Congrats! I would love to help out!

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  17. I still have trouble with showing and telling. I'd be happy to post on my blog. Any day you wish. Just let me know.

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